Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Bitterness hinders prayer

In the book Kneeling We Triumph Volume One, compiled by Edwin and Lillian Harvey, there is a reading entitled “Bitterness hinders prayer.” I think most of us are aware of this fact as it is reiterated in Scripture as A. B. Simpson points out:
“Job had to pray for his very enemies before God could turn his captivity, and had to banish from his heart every particle of bitter feeling towards the men who had tormented him through months of sickness, with their ignorance, misconstruction, and offensive interference. And when he did, God turned his captivity and restored him to more than his former blessings (Job. 42:10).

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Hold God’s s Character True

We, as Christians, often hold a distorted conception of faith which is far from the Biblical original. In Kneeling We Triumph Volume One, Edwin and Lillian Harvey have brought many aspects of prayer to our attention. One of these is the necessity of a total faith in God and in His promises to us which is a prerequisite to effectual prayer. The following quotations, taken from the writings or sermons of God’s saints, emphasize this truth:

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: A sigh of a true Christian is prayer!

We sometimes limit prayer to words we mouth to God through our lips. “The prayers of upright Christians are without ceasing,” Martin Luther tells us, “though they pray not always with their mouth, yet their hearts do pray continually; for the sigh of a true Christian is prayer.”

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Be Still and Know…..

“The world is enough to busy us, not to fill us,” says Thomas Watson. If this is true, then why are we Christians often so busy and so empty? Why do we prefer the hubbub of activity to silence? Or to put it more forcibly: why are we so fearful of silence? Are we afraid of God’s voice which we can sometimes only hear when other voices are hushed? Or are we unwilling to confront our own thoughts which take control when we are quiet? Or do we wish to drown out our accusing conscience which takes advantage of the quiet? Whatever the reasons, over-busyness often prevents us communing with the Almighty, and is therefore an enemy to the healing power that silent meditation and prayer inevitably works in our hectic lives.

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Man’s Strange Reluctance to Commune

At Harvey Christian Publishers’ Online Bookstore you will find some inspiring, in-depth books on prayer. The first of these to be published was Kneeling We Triumph Volumes One and Two. These are compilations—60 short and to the point readings in each volume, which may be treated as daily devotionals. They have been used in seminars and by church prayer-groups and are challenging as well as inspirational.
In a reading in Kneeling We Triumph Volume One entitled “Man’s strange reluctance to commune,” the authors, Edwin and Lillian Harvey include a quotation from F. J. Huegel, a chaplain in World War I. He later served as a missionary in Mexico City.

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They Knew Their God Volume 3: The Prophet of the Long Road

“Someone has said that Methodism really had its birth in Susannah Wesley, the mother of John and Charles. And it might also be said that Elizabeth Asbury, in giving her only son to the ministry, was the mother of American Methodism.” So wrote Edwin and Lillian Harvey in their sketch of Francis Asbury in Volume Three of the series They Knew Their God.
“I well remember my mother strongly urged my father to family reading,” Asbury tells us, “and prayer; the singing of Psalms was much practiced by them both. . . . As a mother above all the women in the world would I claim her for my own, ardently affectionate; as a “mother in Israel” few of her sex have done more by a holy walk to live and by personal labor to support the Gospel, and to wash the saints’ feet. As a friend, she was generous, true, and constant.”

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They Knew Their God Volume 3: She Chose the Good Part

They Knew Their God Volume Three by Edwin and Lillian Harvey, like the other five books in the They Knew Their God series, contains sketches of men and women who served God in their day and generation and whose goal was to know Him intimately. Mary Mozely is one such servant of the Lord. The authors have opened her sketch with the following paragraph:
“Mary Mozley stood on board the Llandovery Castle, waving good bye to friends and relatives. She was about to begin that long voyage which would take her to her chosen mission field. The future was mercifully veiled from the young voyager as she watched the receding shores of her native land.

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Daily Readings available for the New Year

Who among us has not used a daily devotional book at some time or other in our lives? And there is much to choose from.The Christian’s Daily Challenge published by Harvey Christian Publishers is an example of a daily devotional which has been blessed to many Christians throughout the world.

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Kneeling We Triumph Vol. 1: Prayer—our method not our message.

“Prayer is not our message; it is the method of God for the message.” This is the opening statement of the first reading in Kneeling We Triumph Vol. 1. in which many of God’s saints are quoted on the subject of prayer. Edwin and Lillian Harvey, who compiled this book and its companion Kneeling We Triumph Vol. 2, quote from a variety of sources which span centuries and denominations.

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Kneeling We Triumph Vol. 1: Prayer is asking God to do what we cannot do.

“Prayer is releasing the energies of God. For prayer is asking God to do what we cannot do,” says George Trumbull. This statement is quoted in Kneeling We Triumph Volume One, compiled by Edwin and Lillian Harvey. This book and its companion, Kneeling We Triumph Volume Two, contain many quotes from God’s saints who served Him in various denominations but who were all convinced “that prayer does “release the energies of God.” George Trumbull was a Congregational pastor who was also professor at various colleges such as Yale, Andover, and Harvard.

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