Covetousness: Scriptural Examples

“Covetousness ruled the stony, ashen heart of Judas,” writes Samuel Logan Brengle, “and for thirty pieces of silver he betrayed the Master!
“Covetousness,” he continues, “possessed the selfish hearts of Ananias and Sapphira; they wanted the praise and honor of utmost sacrifice and generosity while secretly holding on to their gold. And God smote them dead!

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Prayer brings God out of His secret place

“The great battles,” says Samuel L. Brengle, “the battles that decide our destiny and the destiny of generations yet unborn, are not fought on public platforms, but in the lonely hours of the night and in moments of agony.”

God sets more value on prayer and communion than labor. The heavenly bridegroom is wooing a wife, not hiring a servant. Prayer brings God out of His secret place to work wonders in the earth . . . to pour Himself through the believer into a world of lost souls.
—A. W. Roffe.

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Getting used to God’s Presence

We must remember that it was not by interceding for the world in Glory that Jesus saved it. He gave Himself. Our prayers for the evangelization of the world are but a bitter irony so long as we give only of our superfluity, and draw back before the sacrifice of ourselves.
—M. Francois Collard.

Last night I had a unique experience. I awoke intensely oppressed and as I lay under the dead weight of it, it dawned on me that it meant I was to pray, so I got to work to pray for the men who have just gone off to the fighting line, and in a marvelous way the oppression left and peace ineffable came, and the words emerged, “A house of prayer for all nations.” It is a good thing to stake your confidence on the ground of the perfected Redemption and pray from that basis.
—Oswald Chambers.

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: The Beauty of Delayed Answers

In the book, Kneeling We Triumph Volume One compiled by Edwin and Lillian Harvey, there is a reading entitled “The beauty of delayed answers.” In this reading, the authors have included a moving prayer uttered by the blind poet and hymn-writer, George Matheson and author of that well-known hymn, “O love that will not let me go”:
“My Father, help me to learn that I am heir to possessions which exceed my present holding! They exceed my present power to hold—they are waiting for my summer. Do I ever thank Thee for the blessings which Thou postponest? I am afraid not. I am like the prodigal: I want to get all at once the portion that falleth to me; and, where it is not given, I deem it is refused. Teach me, O Lord, the beauty of Thy delayed answers.”

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Bitterness hinders prayer

In the book Kneeling We Triumph Volume One, compiled by Edwin and Lillian Harvey, there is a reading entitled “Bitterness hinders prayer.” I think most of us are aware of this fact as it is reiterated in Scripture as A. B. Simpson points out:
“Job had to pray for his very enemies before God could turn his captivity, and had to banish from his heart every particle of bitter feeling towards the men who had tormented him through months of sickness, with their ignorance, misconstruction, and offensive interference. And when he did, God turned his captivity and restored him to more than his former blessings (Job. 42:10).

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Hold God’s s Character True

We, as Christians, often hold a distorted conception of faith which is far from the Biblical original. In Kneeling We Triumph Volume One, Edwin and Lillian Harvey have brought many aspects of prayer to our attention. One of these is the necessity of a total faith in God and in His promises to us which is a prerequisite to effectual prayer. The following quotations, taken from the writings or sermons of God’s saints, emphasize this truth:

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: A sigh of a true Christian is prayer!

We sometimes limit prayer to words we mouth to God through our lips. “The prayers of upright Christians are without ceasing,” Martin Luther tells us, “though they pray not always with their mouth, yet their hearts do pray continually; for the sigh of a true Christian is prayer.”

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Be Still and Know…..

“The world is enough to busy us, not to fill us,” says Thomas Watson. If this is true, then why are we Christians often so busy and so empty? Why do we prefer the hubbub of activity to silence? Or to put it more forcibly: why are we so fearful of silence? Are we afraid of God’s voice which we can sometimes only hear when other voices are hushed? Or are we unwilling to confront our own thoughts which take control when we are quiet? Or do we wish to drown out our accusing conscience which takes advantage of the quiet? Whatever the reasons, over-busyness often prevents us communing with the Almighty, and is therefore an enemy to the healing power that silent meditation and prayer inevitably works in our hectic lives.

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Kneeling We Triumph Volume One: Man’s Strange Reluctance to Commune

At Harvey Christian Publishers’ Online Bookstore you will find some inspiring, in-depth books on prayer. The first of these to be published was Kneeling We Triumph Volumes One and Two. These are compilations—60 short and to the point readings in each volume, which may be treated as daily devotionals. They have been used in seminars and by church prayer-groups and are challenging as well as inspirational.
In a reading in Kneeling We Triumph Volume One entitled “Man’s strange reluctance to commune,” the authors, Edwin and Lillian Harvey include a quotation from F. J. Huegel, a chaplain in World War I. He later served as a missionary in Mexico City.

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They Knew Their God Volume 3: The Prophet of the Long Road

“Someone has said that Methodism really had its birth in Susannah Wesley, the mother of John and Charles. And it might also be said that Elizabeth Asbury, in giving her only son to the ministry, was the mother of American Methodism.” So wrote Edwin and Lillian Harvey in their sketch of Francis Asbury in Volume Three of the series They Knew Their God.
“I well remember my mother strongly urged my father to family reading,” Asbury tells us, “and prayer; the singing of Psalms was much practiced by them both. . . . As a mother above all the women in the world would I claim her for my own, ardently affectionate; as a “mother in Israel” few of her sex have done more by a holy walk to live and by personal labor to support the Gospel, and to wash the saints’ feet. As a friend, she was generous, true, and constant.”

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